Thursday, September 20, 2012

Chicken Coop Potpourri!

Yes, your coop can smell good, too, just like mine!

Really! It smells fantastic! Since I started making my Coop Potpourri and tossing in bundles of lavender... now when I open the door, I get this lovely wave of floral herbs. I just love it!




So here's the scoop on getting rid of the poop (well, the poop smell anyway)...

Walk around your yard or garden (or a friends yard - with permission, of course!) and dead head those marigolds and lavender. I also like to cut a few nice looking flowers as well, especially since they're growing so abundantly this year! Just toss it all in a large bucket. (Some of my lavender, the Provence variety, had long stems which I cut off before adding).




Next, prune back some of those herbs, such as rosemary, mint, thyme, etc. It's actually good for the plant, so be brave and cut! Toss all this in the bucket as well, cutting it into smaller portions as you do so. Another option is to cut back the larger plants, such as rosemary, and then pull off the needles by running your fingers over it from top to bottom. Then toss the stems. Don't forget fragrant trees, such as bay leaves (I'm growing several as an evergreen hedge to protect my beehives from winter winds).




Everything gets tossed together and allowed to dry a bit in the bucket. Once it's dry, you can bag it up for use all winter long when the coop is shut tighter than normal. Just think how nice it's going to smell!

As you can see here, I couldn't wait to add some to the nesting boxes. When it's time to refresh the nesting boxes, I just dump the contents right on the floor and add more pine shavings and potpourri for the hens - about a fist full seems right.



My motherly Cuckoo Maran hen seems to enjoy the fragrance during her confinement. She's sitting on 6 eggs and expecting the second week in October if all goes well.







And that extra lavender (trust me, I have a ton!)... it gets tossed on the floor where the chickens move it around as they scratch in the hay and pine shavings. Plus, it gets crushed underfoot when we walk in the coop. Between the two, it releases the oils and fragrance adding a pleasant scent that covers up the less-than-desirable smells.



I was surprised that it really did't take a lot of plants to produce enough coop potpourri for the winter. Use whatever fragrant plants you have, but try to incorporate plenty of plants that have medicinal properties and act as bug repellents and such. And don't forget to add this to your tickler file so you remember to harvest these plants annually for your chicken coop potpourri!

Next year I think I'll raise some additional flowers and herbs to mix in. Chamomile, thyme, scented geraniums...





Featured on Frugal Days, Sustainable Ways; Farmgirl Friday Blog Hop, Farmgirl Friday Blog Fest, Down Home Blog Hop

18 comments:

  1. Oh what a wonderful idea.
    The growing season for these things is just coming to an end...however, we get about 254 growing days a year...approximately. So I guess I could do some research and find out what I have in the area that will grow this fall.
    I love this idea!

    So happy to read it. thanks so much, Pat

    ReplyDelete
  2. Amy, I love that you're doing this. Our hens love herbs in their boxes too. I hope you'll come join my very first blog fest and link up this fun post: http://fresh-eggs-daily.blogspot.com/2012/09/farm-girl-friday-blog-fest-1.html

    ReplyDelete
  3. What a great idea! Going to do this today!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Definately gonna try this one! Thanks Amy. :)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Will definately have to try this!! Have many of the same flowers growing around our property that would love to have the same positive affect you've described having in your coop.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Yes, what a wonderful idea! I have been deadheading marigolds and never thought to collect them (along with other cuttings) for the coop. Thanks so much for sharing such an ingenious way to cut down on coop odors. :)

    ReplyDelete
  7. What a great idea! I was just thinking this morning as I let the chickens out that their coop was getting kinda smelly. I have lots of herbs still growing so I'm going to toss some of them in the coop today. Thanks for the idea!

    ReplyDelete
  8. This is GENIUS!!! I am totally going to try this with all our extra lavender and rosemary!

    ReplyDelete
  9. I've been wanting to do this! I have a big sweet annie plant that needs to be used & it smells amazing! We also have cukoo marans, americaunas & our newest addition, black copper marans from Oregon!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Chicken coopourri! What a great idea. Didn't do many herbs this year...have a lot of basil still (can I use that?). I gave my rosemary plant to a friend when her husband passed away, but I have some scented geranium leaves. We're just getting started this year so I'll plan for extra for next year. Maybe I can share my lavender.....

    ReplyDelete
  11. Oh this is a wonderful idea. It will be a great way to use some of my herbs from our herb garden!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Thank you, Amy, for inspiring me--I've got all those plants and want to use them before the frost hits. My daughter and I used some of ours to make some cute fall wreaths for the doors. Made the base of willow branches and then added the herbs and flowers--makes the house smell lovely! Now I have a perfect idea for using up the rest!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Oh Amy I just love this post! Would you mind linking up again today? I'd be honored. I just know my fellow chicken keepers would LOVE to do this!

    ReplyDelete
  14. I would have never thought of this.... and boy oh boy... could I use it!

    ReplyDelete
  15. such a wonderful idea!! we are getting chicken soon, I daresay the smell of herbs in a chicken coop would be lovely!

    ReplyDelete
  16. I am also buying some chicken coops with in few days.Was just seeking some information about chicken coops and the other which you have shared above.It was very helpful for me to visit your blog.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I want a chicken coop!! I need to do a lot more research...Like, how do you know which eggs are un-fertilized , cattle panels edible eggs and baby chicken eggs. Maybe that's a really ridiculous thing not to know?

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for visiting Homestead Revival™! Please feel free to contribute to the conversation by leaving your comments. "Let no unwholesome word proceed from your mouth, but only such a word as is good for edification according to the need of the moment, so that it will give grace to those who hear." Eph. 4:29

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails