Friday, October 12, 2012

Inspiration Friday: Propagating Herbs

We've just had our first real cold snap. Thankfully, the change in weather included some much needed rain, without dipping below the 32 degree mark yet! As a result, we've been trying to save the last of the warm season crops any way possible. Our dehydrator has been going non-stop, along with a bit of freezing, some occasional canning, and lots of good eating!

Propagating basil before it's gone is just one more way we're trying to save a bit of summer, as we anticipate a mid-winter smattering of fresh herbs for the dark, colder months of December and beyond. During these winter months, having something green to add to the plate gives us much needed variety to the various root vegetables that dominate the season while reminding us that life still exists in the garden, though the ground seems quiet and lifeless.


You can certainly start an indoor herb garden in pots by purchasing plants or starting seeds, but if you already have plants in the ground, get a jump start by propagating and dividing (note: parsley and cilantro do better from seed). Typically, this is best done in spring or early summer, when it's warm, but if you're going to keep them warm inside, it should work fine. Here's some links to show you how (click the link below each photo for instructions)...

BASIL

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MINT

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CHIVES


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THYME, OREGANO,  & MARJORAM


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ROSEMARY


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GERANIUM, LAVENDER, LEMON BALM, TARRAGON, SAGE, & OREGANO


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For some herbs, there's more than one way to create a new plant from an existing one. So if you attempt one method and it doesn't work, don't give up... try another. The processes alone is worth the little bit of effort invested...

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their beauty and fragrance make them one of my all time favorite plants. These are my "go-to" botanicals when I don't know what else to plant, but I need something in some garden space, a centerpiece at a dinner party, or a bit of inexpensive flora therapy. I do believe the presence of herbs indoors makes winter a bit more bearable!





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