Friday, July 30, 2010

Keeping A Record Of Egg Production

I know... keeping records takes the fun out of it all, right? Perhaps a bit, but having a record of your layers really isn't too difficult and can teach kids some basic business skills. Besides, how else are you going to know how many eggs you can sell, or give away, or when the hens went broody last year, or how much those precious eggs are costing you... that kind of thing. If you can just keep it all in your head and remember, well, you're a better woman than I am! My brain is maxed out already!




A few months ago I decided to create a record sheet to contain most of the information that I wanted to know about my chickens. Things like when I let them free range, when I gave away eggs, sold some, or used a dozen. I wanted information about when I bought feed and how much I paid so I knew what my eggs were costing me. And I wanted to remember when a hen pecked an egg, went broody or molted. 




Okay, I'm a bit fanatical about it. But seriously, this information has been really helpful to have at my fingertips. The other day a gal wanted to know if she could be one of my regular customers. All I had to do was look at my production and I knew immediately if it was possible to add her. I'm hoping that it will remind me to watch the French Marans next July for broodiness!

And since I'm the 4H Poultry leader this coming fall, I guess I'd better set a good example. You think?

Here's a free download so you can use my new chart for your own hens. I need to make any corrections before I start teaching the kids this year so let me know what you think.

15 comments:

  1. Thank you for posting this! I am going to start using your chart to keep track of our egg production and cost. :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Amy, You are too funny! Leave it to you to be organized even with your laying hens!! :) I am so unorganized but I may take you up on your chart and try it out. Thanks. ♥

    ReplyDelete
  3. Great time to post this, with a new month just a day away! I'm going to print it out and put it in my "Big House" coop and track for the month of August to see how it works for me. I've got 21 new hens that are just starting/soon to start to laying and 9 older hens and have just started selling instead of giving away all of my eggs. Thanks for putting this together.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thank you for looking into my own brain and putting this together! I currently keep a running tally of eggs on my calendar and then when I change months I transfer all the info to a different book. This will save me the trouble of transferring it. What about a spot for the weather each day? Thanks again...I read your blog everyday!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hum never thought about doing this, good idea girl thanks will do it too, will give me an idea if it is worth having these chickens for sure.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Amy you are sooo organized! I can not have chickens (I get them at the farmers market instead), but I love to hear anything about your hens and the girls' house! Keep those photos coming! Have an excellent weekend...

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi Amy,

    I think this is such a smart idea...and no you're not crazy.. :) :) :) It's a good way to keep track of things and you'll learn something about your chickens!!! Since I"m in an apartment and chickens aren't exactly allowed...I "keep track" of other things..:) :) :) ..like homemade laundry soap. I'm keeping track of how many loads I get out of a batch..so that way, once I have that figured...I can maybe use a different soap to lower the overall cost,if necessary etc...but anyway, I like to do that. it helps keep my budget in check and on occasion, helps me save money too...

    Keep bringing us more chick stories, please :) :) :) Have a good weekend. Love and hugs from Oregon, Heather :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. How do you tell how many are laying? I write down how many I collected for the day on a calendar on the fridge, then transfer to an Excel spreadsheet that does the calculations for me. I also track how much milk we get from the goats. I like your form and might ammend my spreadsheet to include some of the things you have. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Kelly, I don't always know WHICH hens are laying other than by egg color, but I have a general idea how many are/aren't just by keeping an eye out. That part of the record sheet isn't "scientific".

    My friend over at Thy Hand Hath Provided has little rings around the leg of each hen and they are different colors (if I remember correctly). This is good if you have several of the same breed.

    ReplyDelete
  10. This is a great table. Until recently we've been marking down every single egg laid by each hen (we have 4). We can tell each apart, and it's been really illuminating to look over and think 'ooooh, she hasn't laid in about 2 weeks, i think she IS broody and not just lazy' haha. We're about to move and have been giving away our hens one at a time, so have stopped writing it down. Plus, my husband was always forgetting to write it down when he'd collect an egg and i would forget to write down when i purchased feed or sold a dozen... I think this table will be a great resource once we're resettled and have more hens. Will b emuch easier not trying to descipher every hen's egg!

    ReplyDelete
  11. I just found your blog and love it. My husband and I were just discussing that this be the year we invest in 5 chickens. I was looking up chicken coops when I stumbled upon this. Thanks. I'll be a regular follower now.

    ReplyDelete
  12. This chart is great and something I have been trying to find, but I cannot seem to download it without paying for a Scribd membership. I think I'll just go ahead and ask the organic learning farm we volunteered at for the use of theirs because I don't want to have to pay to download something.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Ok, I was able to print it. Yay. :-) Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  14. When I printed it out it did not print correctly or full page so it did not work. :( I'm off to email the learning farm.

    Sorry for all the comments feel free to delete all of mine.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for visiting Homestead Revival™! Please feel free to contribute to the conversation by leaving your comments. "Let no unwholesome word proceed from your mouth, but only such a word as is good for edification according to the need of the moment, so that it will give grace to those who hear." Eph. 4:29

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails